The 24-hour Rule of planning projects

I’ve got a friend, a person I supervise actually, for whom I have made up a rule that I have strongly suggested she adopt. Every time she gets upset about something at a meeting, she should write it down. Then she should wait 24 hours, and if it still seems like something she needs to mention, then she should. She has some big problems: she is immature and tends to both get caught up in mob momentum, and speaks her mind just a little too freely (especially for someone in her position in the company). Sooner or later, if she doesn’t change, she’s going to have some serious professional problems. The 24-hour delay serves as a cooling-off period until such time as she learns when a particular ditch is worth dying in, and when it isn’t.

Anyways, I have a similar policy for myself, both in terms of mixing it up at work and for terrain-building projects. In the past, I’ve gotten an idea into my head, started casting lots of bricks, and then decided against it, leaving me with lots of bricks. So now I get an idea and just sit on for a few days before starting. That also keeps me from not finishing projects, like the third skematic piece or the Descent dungeon.

There’s a couple of things in the 24-hour cooling period. The first is a project that would be essentially a homage to the Minas Tirith layout that “Law” did on Voidgamers. [note: Voidgamers appears to be down right now] Law’s layout was essentially large tiles with fairly disjointed pieces that could be rearranged into different layouts. I liked the surreal quality to it: it sort of didn’t make sense but could hang together. It also made for great wargaming terrain–lots of places to duck in and out.

The other is a “realistic scale” castle. The problem with most wargaming-scaled castles is that they are terribly small in comparison to the real thing. I’ve been thinking about something more true-to-life. I’m imagining fighting battles where the table is just one part of a greater castle, with the miniatures that sections defenders or attackers, maybe even just a single wall segment and a tower. As with any big project, it’d tie up a lot of time, money, and resources, so I would want something that would be versatile (like Law’s layout) as well. That’s why I wait 24 hours before starting.

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One thought on “The 24-hour Rule of planning projects

  1. Pingback: Is there room for a Microtable? « Strange Vistas

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